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Breaking down barriers: Getting Syrian children into school in Turkey

In regards to financial highlights, the joint report stated that “international funding is insufficient given the need. According to the MoNE officials, financial support covers only 10% of the current school and classroom requirements in Turkey.”
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The Foundation for Political, Economic and Social Research (SETA) and Theirworld published a joint report in concern with the social inclusion of Syrian refugees into Turkish society, with a specific focus on the admittance of Syrian children into schools.

“The report was conducted on two main research questions. The first question deals with the reasons why some of the Syrian students are unschooled and aims to provide policy suggestions regarding these causes. The second question focuses on the current situation of the Syrians schooled in Turkey by presenting recommendations which are supposed to enhance the current situation.”

According to current figures, 3, 006, 298 Syrians live in Turkey. While 833,039 of them are school age children (5-18 years old), the report found that “out of these students, 65% attend TECs while 35% attend public schools.”

“The target for next year is to increase the number of schooled Syrian students to 550,000 and the rate of schooling to 65%. Ministry of Education (MoNE), which has made a decision to convert TECs to Public Schools in the next three years, has planned the number of Syrian students in Public Schools to be 300,000 and the number of Syrian students in TECs to be 250,000.”

In regards to financial highlights, the joint report stated that “international funding is insufficient given the need. According to the MoNE officials, financial support covers only 10% of the current school and classroom requirements in Turkey.”

There are a number of factors that contribute to the lack of education of Syrian children in Turkey, including fleeing from war, poverty and trauma. “According to psychologists who work with Syrian children that were interviewed, war and migration trauma have been converted into domestic trauma. Although most children, especially the ones at primary school levels, came to Turkey at too young ages to recall the war, the trauma in their families can be reflected in domestic relationships.”

“In summary, it was observed in the interviews that Turkey has covered a large ground in creating a system for the education of Syrians but especially human resources and finances will be inadequate for this mission in the upcoming years.”

The report goes further to provide solutions to this problem in detail. The report can be found online: setav.org

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