In April, Turkish citizens will vote on what may be the most important change to the nation’s constitution in a century, moving the government away from an often deadlocked Parliamentary system to a Presidential one, albeit with some features that will distinguish it from other such systems in the world today. While much criticism has been leveled that the proposed changes will hand too much power to the President, the fact remains the amendments are supported by what may be a majority of Turkish voters. So what accounts for this dissonance?

Belkıs Kılıçkaya explains how critics of Turkey’s proposed Presidential system miss the fact that France already has had one for decades. Cem Duran Uzun unravels the reasons behind the proposed changes to the Judiciary in Turkey, which are an attempt to make the institution more impartial, and end its historic politicization. In two articles, Ali Aslan retraces the historic anti-democratic role Turkey’s main opposition party, the CHP, has played, and how the new Presidential system is meant to force the country’s political blocks to think outside outdated notions of secular and religious identity groups. And Serdar Gülener takes a look at the criticism that the new system will do away with checks and balances between the Legislative, Executive, and Judicial branches.

President at Élysée Palace, Queen at Buckingham Palace!

Some of the French say “Britain has a real democracy under the cover of monarchy, while France has a real …

Why Turkey Does Not Have a Real Opposition Party

Turkish politics has flared up after the Justice and Development Party (AK Party) and the Nationalist Movement Party (MHP) have …

Democratization of the Republic through Presidentialism

Turkish politics is currently polarized by the debate over a constitutional reform bill. The ruling Justice and Development Party (AK …

Checks and Balances in the Proposed Amendment to the Constitution of Turkey

In the previous days, the Justice and Development Party (AK Party) and Nationalist Movement Party (MHP) built a consensus on …

Turkey’s war on the PKK’s terror has impacted the country for decades, but nowhere more so than in the country’s southeast, where it has displaced hundreds of thousands who were hoping to build a life in a country that is economically and socially prospering. To end the PKK’s terrorism, it is important to understand the group is responsible for the current cycle of violence, and to identify the social structures that need to be built to ensure it cannot exploit and intimidate locals again in the future. Yusuf Özkır points out how the HDP lost the political moment and betrayed the support locals gave it in 2015, opting to support a terrorist group instead of the rule of law. Ipek Coşkun examines the social structures that need nourishment in Diyarbakir to help people return to a normal life. Mehmet Solmaz reports from Brussels and takes up his unanswered questions about why the PKK enjoys full freedom in Europe.

Diyarbakır: How far from Normalization?

About this time last year, the government took a firm action against the PKK and started anti-terror operations in Diyarbakır. …

The Collapse of the HDP’s Politics

On July 22, 2015, the PKK terrorist organization shot dead two policemen in the Ceylanpınar district of Şanlıurfa, marking the …

Questions Remain Unanswered as the PKK Enjoys Full Freedom in Europe

After years of reporting in Turkey, I moved to the heart of Europe in October. In this past three months, …

Over the last fifteen years Turkey has emerged as a robust economy, and the standard of living for its burgeoning population has increased dramatically, but this success brings with it the challenge of meeting the energy needs of a fast-developing nation. As part of its 2023 plan, Turkey is looking to cultivate stable, reliable energy sources. Currently, more than 70 percent of Turkey’s energy needs are met by imports, mostly fossil fuels, from countries and regions that are not always politically or economically stable. A goal has been set to make renewable energy – wind, hydorelectric, solar, geothermal, and biomass – account for 30 percent of Turkey’s energy supply by 2023. In this Investigation, The New Turkey takes a look at the details of these plans, with articles by İsmail Kavaz, Erdal Tanas Karagöl, Salihe Kaya, and Ilya Roubanis.

Renewable Energy is Key for Turkey’s 2023 Agenda

After the first oil shock in 1973, the importance of energy was understood better by individuals and institutions. In the …

The Future of Fossil Fuels and Turkey’s Policy for Reducing Dependence

Fossil fuels are an essential part of global energy demand. In fact, according to statistics from 2014, 86 percent of …

Why LNG is Significant for Turkey’s Energy Market

In the 21st Century, natural gas is undergoing its “golden age” with the emergence of new technology for its development. …

Energy and Turkey’s South Caucasus Policy: the EU Regionalization Catalyst

In the early 1990s, Turkey’s role in the South Caucasus was seen as part of a greater scheme of liberalization, …

The coup attempt, which took place in the evening of July 15, 2016 and aimed at toppling the democratically-elected Turkish government by using brutal force, was thwarted thanks to the level of democratic maturity in Turkey. The New Turkey published several articles investigating political, social, and economic aspects of July 15 resistance to the coup attempt.

Turkey’s July 15 Revolution

Revolutions are defined as periods in which fast and comprehensive changes in political systems take place. Thus, a revolutionary period …

Why should not the West love the Gülenists?

The Gülenists, led by US-based cleric Fethullah Gülen, is allegedly behind the failed coup attempt of July 15 in Turkey. …

The Sense of Betrayal in Turkish Society after the Coup Attempt

Following the failed coup attempt of July 15, established ideological dichotomies in Turkish society, such as secularist/anti-secularist, leftist/rightist, conservative/progressive or …

The Defender of Democracy: The Turkish People

“Do not watch superhero movies, just look at one another’s face.” These words, uttered by a university student who took …

Despite the long history of friendship and partnership between Turkey and Germany, there are tidal waves of symmetry and asymmetry in political relations of the two countries. Some German media groups and politicians opt for persistent and imbalanced criticism against Turkey, whereas the German Parliament’s last decision on the Armenian mass deportations in 1915 in Anatolia is expected to have deteriorating effects over the bilateral relations. The New Turkey investigated current biased representations of Turkey in Germany.

Is German Law Being Politicized?

The night of July 15, 2016, marks a turning point in Turkish history, when citizens traumatized by the coup attempt …

German Media and Turkey

Do you think the mainstream media in Germany is getting more and more obsessed with the current Turkish government? Are they …

Deficits of Freedom of Expression in Germany

Speech is one of the essential attributes of humans, in that it is precisely what separates us from all other …

The troubling legacy of the Sykes-Picot Agreement is not just a by-gone memory but rather a haunting spirit for the peoples of the Middle East. The real actors of the region are still denied the capacity to decide their own future. In the midst of local and international political and military rivalry, Sykes-Picot remains an undying symbol of Western imperialism in the Middle East. The New Turkeyinvestigated the current repercussions of this troubling legacy through articles by Prof. Muhittin Ataman, Prof. Berdal Aral and Assist. Prof. Talha Köse.

The Troubling Legacy of the Sykes-Picot: A Century-Old Chaos in the Arab Middle East

Precisely a hundred years ago, on 16 May 1916, the iniquitous Sykes-Picot Agreement (1916) was signed between Britain and France …

Sykes-Picot: The Symbol of Western Imperialism in the Middle East

Many political scientists and historians consider the First World War as an imperialist war carving up the Ottoman State. During …

Is the Spirit of Sykes-Picot Still Alive in the Middle East after a Century?

On 16 May, 1916, the famous Sykes-Picot agreement was signed secretly between the United Kingdom and France. The agreement was …

The New Turkey investigated the future of Turkish-Egyptian relations, and discovered that there are conflicting visions and scenarios with regards to cost-benefit calculations: while some argue that a rapprochement between the two countries might bring more benefits than costs, others assert that this optimism is too naive and unrealistic. The debate, however, is expected to continue.

Going Back to the Origins: Change and Continuity in Egyptian Society

Faruk Yaslıçimen, Editor in Chief of The New Turkey, interviewed with the director of the Yunus Emre Institute in Cairo …

Is Normalization Possible in Turkish-Egyptian Relations?

Turkish-Egyptian relations have been in a severe crisis since the military coup in Egypt in 2013. Recent months have witnessed …

Turkey and Egypt: Towards a Normalization?

The debate surrounding relations between Turkey and Egypt is on the rise largely because of a series of political maneuverings …

The debates for a new constitution resumed in Turkey. The government is determined to ensure the writing of a new constitution, in a rather participatory way, to replace the 1982 Constitution wich clearly reflects the authoritarian, statist, and tutelary mentality of its founders. thenewturkey.org investigated different aspects of the constitution-making process.

1982 Constitution and the Politics in the Grip of Bureaucratic Tutelage

The 1982 Constitution and the Limits of Politics  As the determinants of the legal norms forming a state a constitution …

Who Has the Right to Make a Constitution?

From a societal perspective, a constitution is a multidimensional phenomenon. According to Kenneth Wheare, a distinguished authority on constitutions, there …

Turkey’s New Constitution Should Mention Beginning of New Political System

Turkey has once again raised hopes of having a civilian constitution for the first time in the history of the …