Mevlüt Tatlıyer

Mevlüt Tatlıyer

Dr. Mevlüt Tatlıyer received his BS in Management Engineering from Istanbul Technical University in 2007 and obtained his MA in Financial Economics from Istanbul Bilgi University in 2010. He completed his PhD at Istanbul University in 2014 and is currently an Assistant Professor at Istanbul Medipol University.
Politicization of Finance Against Turkey

Politicization of Finance Against Turkey

June 3, 2018
Ahead of the snap election in June 2018, Turkey is under a severe financial attack. It is quite apparent that Turkey’s macroeconomic indicators are quite healthy, and it is not possible to explain the current financial pressure “economically”.
What are the Ratings of Credit Rating Agencies Themselves

What are the Ratings of Credit Rating Agencies Themselves?

May 16, 2018
What are the ratings of credit rating agencies themselves, then? It is well below “credibility” for most people around the world, apparently. With a negative outlook. And no (upward) revision is on the horizon.
Does the Tight Monetary Policy Stance of Central Banks Stand

Does the Tight Monetary Policy Stance of Central Banks Stand Empirical Scrutiny?

May 3, 2018
Time is more than ripe for the TCMB to reconsider its monetary policy stance and take into account real factors such as employment, economic growth, income inequality and, last but not least, the development process of the country when constructing monetary policy function. After all, central banks are for the people, right?
Why Are Developing Countries Pursuing Wrong Types of Monetary Policy

Why Are Developing Countries Pursuing Wrong Types of Monetary Policy?

April 19, 2018
Pursuing a low policy interest rate – undervalued exchange rate regime has become much harder in the neoliberal era. However, in order to complete industrialization processes, developing countries such as Turkey should adopt this regime.
What are the Prospects of the Turkish Economy

What are the Prospects of the Turkish Economy?

April 5, 2018
A developing country such as Turkey needs not an over-valued currency but certainly an undervalued currency. The Turkish Lira had been tremendously overvalued against the Dollar and Euro in the 2000s up until a couple of years ago thanks to the abundant global liquidity and tight monetary policy in Turkey.
Not Financial Speculations but Financial Attacks against Turkey

Not Financial Speculations, but Financial Attacks against Turkey?

March 22, 2018
There is a general sentiment within Turkish society that volatility in the Turkish lira has its roots not in economy, but in politics, and is an economic extension to the slow motion war against Turkey waged by “subcontractor” terrorist organizations.
The Quest for Financial Stability in a Financialized World

The Quest for Financial Stability in a Financialized World

November 3, 2017
Although financial stability in today’s extremely financialized world is not easy to achieve, there are important – yet not exhaustive - tools such as wealth funds, capital controls and use of local currencies in order to lessen the negative effects emanating from unfettered financial markets in an era of financial supremacy.
What s Next for the Turkish Lira

What’s Next for the Turkish Lira?

January 16, 2017
In fact, it is very hard for the currency to stay where it is now. (Indeed, it decreased sharply from over 3.90 to about 3.70 in just two days.) So, once the speculative wave fades away, then can we see a sharp decline in the TL/US parity. Until where? Well, one can expect first around 3.60s and then 3.30s.
How Turkish Economy Beat the Coup Attempt

How Turkish Economy Beat the Coup Attempt

August 10, 2016
The Turkish economy showed the glimpses of its resilience in the aftermath of the failed coup attempt, such that the economy and financial system have worked very well without any instability; as if nothing major took place just a matter of days earlier.
The Defender of Democracy The Turkish People

The Defender of Democracy: The Turkish People

July 27, 2016
“Do not watch superhero movies, just look at one another’s face.” These words, uttered by a university student who took to the streets like hundreds of thousands of people all over Turkey in an effort to thwart the coup attempt, reflect an apparent reality.